When Liesel first arrives on Himmel Street her inability to read brings her closer with her foster father Hans Hubermann

When Liesel first arrives on Himmel Street her inability to read brings her closer with her foster father Hans Hubermann. Hans is inspired to teach Liesel how to read and write, he doesn’t give up until she is confident in herself. Liesel looks forward to her midnight reading lessons with Hans and develops an inseparable bond with him early on in the novel. With the help of Hans Hubermann and her own determination the words do eventually come to Liesel. Death foreshadows this; ” Trust me, though, the words were on their way, and when they arrived, Liesel would hold them in her hands like clouds, and she would wring them out like rain” (Zusak 80). Hans gains Liesel’s trust making Liesel have a sense of belonging in the Hubermann household. Hans’ initial love shown to Liesel is identified in this quote; “….Like soft silver, melting. Liesel, upon seeing those eyes, understood that Hans Hubermann was worth a lot” (Zusak 34). Liesel developed an ironic friendship with a Jew, Max Vandenburg. During a time of such hate, discrimination and brutality, Liesel looked passed that and welcomed Max into her life. Max and Liesel communicated effectively through words and share a common interest in reading and writing. They teach eachother many important things throughout the novel. Max encourages Liesel with her reading and even makes Liesel her own book that later becomes known as The Book Thief. With the help of Liesel, Max begins to notice the beauty of humanity amongst all the hatred going on around them. “Often I wish this would all be over, Liesel, but then somehow you do something like walk down the basement steps with a snowman in your hands” (Zusak 313).